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March 28, 2006

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Fly on The Wall #2: If Internal Communication is Poor, Can You Still Have a "Great Culture"?:

» Is Poor Communication Undermining the Culture in Your Firm? from Legal Ease Blog
Michelle Golden of Golden Practices has a great post today entitled, If Internal Communication is Poor, Can You Still Have A Great Culture? She warns that firms that take their 'great culture' for granted are playing with fire. She lists [Read More]

» Building a Great Culture Is An Inside Job. from What About Clients?
Michelle Golden and Allison Shields have important posts about this. If you are selling your law firm as a happy, fun, competent and collaborative professionals, it's got to be real. And, ironically, it takes discipline and hard work to get... [Read More]

» Building a Great Culture Is An Inside Job. from What About Clients?
Michelle Golden and Allison Shields have important posts about this. If you are selling your services firm as happy, fun, competent and collaborative professionals, it's got to be real. And, ironically, it takes discipline and hard work to get that... [Read More]

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Dina Beach Lynch, Esq.

Michelle, great list. I appreciated Allison's additions so much I left the following post on her blog.

Listening is a much underrated tool for creating or maintaining an employee-friendly culture. However, most firms fail to listen properly.

Listening without a plan for action is ineffective. Most employees want to know that if they take the time, effort and risk to offer feedback on firm matters that someone will actually act upon their suggestions.

Failing to design and communicate the action plan for feedback to employees is a sure way to build mistrust. I’ve seen many instances in my work as an Ombuds where good intentions were thwarted by inaction. Employees became skeptical and thought of any effort as ‘lip service’.

So to those firms that pride themselves on having an ‘open door policy’ to listen to employee concerns and interests I have one simple question: what happened next?
If the answer is nothing much, you’re creating a culture, but not the one you intended.- end

If professionals don't listen well and actively to each other, how can their clients trust that they will be listened to and valued? Building a great culture isn't just a nice idea; it's a business imperative!

Dina Beach Lynch, Ombuds
http://www.workwelltogether.com

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